Nigunim

In this section we list the growing number of sites that hold real music files (mainly in MP3 format)of tunes that are sung in the Minhogei Ashkenaz (MA) shuls. These files may be listened to directly, downloaded for storage on your hard-disk - or putting on MP3 players.

  • KAJY Ramot: A special thanks to Mr Michael Friedman of Kehal Adas Yeshurun in Ramot, Jerusalem for having made a tremendous contribution to this aspect of our work. For further information and the music itself click here Tunes from KAYJ - Ramot
Over the last years this intiative has grown and they operate a newsforum for active/public exchange of news and information. Click here to view the correspondence on the forum.
Mention is made of Mr. Benno Weis Z'L, who was kind enough to provide recordings he made of the old Frankfurter Nusach (when he was about age 70-80!).
His daughter writes "Benno Weis was born in Frankfurt in 1910, where he learned the nusach just by listening to the chazzon Benno Peisachowitz. Mr. Weis was a baal korah and baal tefila in the Breuer shul in Washington Heights for over 50 years. And had the foresight to record these niggunim for the next generation. He taught approx 275 boys in the fine art of kerias hatorah, and many people consulted him on Frankfurter minhogim.
If you are interested in getting the tapes of the niggunim, please email her at rweis@artusworld.com, or call US 718-376-0762"
  • IGB Basel: For an interesting summary of the choir at the Basel shul see .... and to actually hear some of their tunes... click here
  • GGBH London: In the Cohanim handbook (V'ani Avoracheim by Eli Katz), there are some 12 pages of musical score of the nigunim of Birchas Cohanim/Dechunin as sung at that shul. We hope to include copies of this at some point.see sample page Δ
  • D'Alsace - France: An interesting web-site - with the history of the Jews of d'Alsace and de Lorraine communities :- Colmar - Mulhouse - Strasbourg - Metz and Nancy. Note it is in French and we do not vouch for the level of orthodoxy of the choirs. We recommend listening to Michael Heyman

Last updated 1 August '08